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Article

Volvo unmasks redical new Concept Recharge EV

Volvo recently announced that its entire car line-up would be fully electric by 2030, and for the Swedish carmaker it means not only a shift in powertrains, but also a new paradigm in car design.

Volvo unmasks radical new Concept Recharge EV


Source: www.timeslive.co.za

It has launched the new Concept Recharge as what it terms a styling manifesto for the next generation of battery-powered Volvos.

It’s been a long time since Volvos were boxy, but the Concept Recharge takes sleek styling into a new realm for a marque once famous for its square and stodgy designs.

“True to the heritage of Scandinavian design, Concept Recharge has the mantra of ‘less but better’ at its core,” says a Volvo spokesperson.

“For example, by removing the complexity of the internal combustion engine (ICE), the designers have been able to evolve the car’s proportions to increase interior space while also improving aerodynamic efficiency. The result is a car that offers genuinely better solutions to support a sustainable family life.”

Volvo’s first generation of electric cars shares a floor with ICE-powered cars, which requires a balance in proportions and space to be able to accommodate both a battery pack and an ICE.

But the firm’s next generation of fully electric cars — the first of which is the company’s first SUV on a completely new electric-only base — will feature flat floors, as previewed in the Concept Recharge.

By removing the engine and replacing it with a full battery pack under the flat floor, the designers have extended the wheelbase and the wheel size of the car. The result is shorter overhangs, as well as a lot more interior space including a large storage area between the front seats.

Designers have repositioned the seats, optimised the roof profile and lowered the bonnet while retaining the high eye point beloved by drivers of SUVs such as the Volvo XC40, XC60 and XC90. This approach creates efficiency gains in aerodynamics compared with a typical SUV, which improves range.

This concept car also introduces a new Volvo design language. Continuing the theme of “less but better”, all unnecessary elements have been removed and what remains is treated with a high-precision, flush execution.

With no engine to cool, the traditional grille has been replaced with a shield-like structure, supported by a new interpretation of Volvo Cars’ “Thor’s Hammer” headlight design.

“Our Concept Recharge represents a manifesto for the all-electric future of Volvo Cars, as well as a new type of vehicle,” said Robin Page, head of design. “It displays new and modern proportions that go hand-in-hand with increased versatility and shows what technology can enable in terms of design.”

The flat floor provides more space and a better seating position for all those inside the car.

A large, 38cm standing touch screen is the centre of a new and improved user experience for a next-generation connected infotainment system. It goes hand-in-hand with those other hallmarks of Scandinavian design: clean lines and extensive use of sustainable and natural materials inside the cabin.

“Inside the Concept Recharge, we create a truly Scandinavian living-room feeling,” said Page. “Each part of the interior is like a piece of art and could stand alone as individual furniture in a room.”

The concept car also reflects Volvo’s safety ambitions in the coming years. A LIDAR sensor, a critical part of Volvo’s plan for forthcoming safe autonomous drive technology, is placed in an optimal position on the roof to collect data on the environment around the car.

“With the Concept Recharge we continue the rich roots of Volvo’s design DNA in a modern and fresh way as we move into our all-electric future,” said Page.

Volvo Cars was founded in 1927 and has been under the ownership of the China’s Zhejiang Geely Holding since 2010.


Article

Five things you can do in a smart car

You might be familiar with Android Auto, the wireless interface that links your Google-powered smartphone to your vehicle's infotainment system

Five things you can do in a smart car


Source: www.news24.com

Did you know the multinational technology giant has also developed something called Android Automotive? The latter is an infotainment operating system (OS) that runs directly on the in-vehicle hardware (rather than on a smartphone or tablet), complete with various built-in Google applications and services.

It's an open-source, highly customisable platform – which is good news for third-party developers – capable of supporting general apps built for Android as well as those already created specifically for Android Auto. This means drivers will soon be able to use hundreds of current and future apps offered by Google, automakers and third-party developers, as long as these meet the company's driver-distraction guidelines (and a few other restrictions).

So, what sorts of interesting features are available with this fresh operating system, which automakers that partner with Google can reskin to their requirements? Well, it's early days yet but let's take a look at five of the more useful ones we've already spotted.

1. Have a two-way conversation with a virtual assistant

Vehicles running the Android Automotive OS – such as the new, fully electric Volvo XC40 P8 Recharge – ship standard with Google Assistant. This artificial intelligence-powered virtual assistant can hold a two-way conversation with the user, meaning it largely understands natural speech and isn't restricted to specific, predetermined commands.

The driver is thus able to use their voice to control a range of functions, from adjusting the climate system to entering a destination in the navigation, changing the radio station, sending a message and even managing a calendar.

2. Control your car from your phone

The new Android Automotive OS is fully integrated with services such as Volvo On Call, offering both classic functions (such as the ability to pre-heat or pre-cool the vehicle's cabin ahead of a journey and helping you locate your car in a crowded parking lot) and new features like monitoring the vehicle's battery status and keeping a list of your preferred charging locations.

3. Stream audiobooks using voice commands

Android-powered vehicles come with the Libby application natively installed on the infotainment system, giving users access to millions of audiobooks even if they don't have their smartphone or tablet with them. And, since Google Assistant is likewise integrated into the OS, the driver can safely employ voice control to find a particular title, skip between chapters, change the narration speed, and more.

Similarly, various podcast, radio and music apps are available to be embedded on the vehicle's system.

4. Update your car's system 'over-the-air'

Worried your new car's infotainment system will soon be out of date? Well, you needn't, since vehicles powered by Android are capable of receiving software and operating system updates over the air, effectively allowing them to keep improving over time.

Over-the-air updates – which can be scheduled overnight or during other typically lengthy charging periods – cover everything from maintenance to the installation of brand new system features.

5. Find charging stations using integrated maps

Though the open-source nature of Android Automotive OS means any number of navigation apps can be installed, the embedded Google Maps version – which, of course, can be managed using the aforementioned voice control – includes three clever shortcuts: restaurant, parking and charging stations. The latter is particularly handy for owners of electric vehicles looking to plug in.

Furthermore, should you be using route guidance in your XC40 P8 Recharge, it'll also show the vehicle's current charge level as well as the expected level when you arrive at your destination.


Article

Volvo heralds new era with Concept Recharge as electric future becomes reality

Volvo Cars has lifted the veil on its Concept Recharge, a concept vehicle with a completely flat floor that showcases the direction the Swedish automaker is moving in with its electric vehicles.

Volvo heralds new era with Concept Recharge as electric future becomes reality


Source: www.news24.com

Volvo Cars has lifted the veil on its Concept Recharge, a concept vehicle with a completely flat floor that showcases the direction the Swedish automaker is moving in with its electric vehicles. According to Volvo, the Concept Recharge is a manifesto for the next generation of all-electric Volvos. The Concept Recharge pays homage to the Scandinavian design ethos of 'less but better', where the internal combustion engine has been removed, and the proportions have been adjusted to create a bigger interior.

Volvo says that by removing the engine and replacing it with a full battery pack under the flat floor, the designers have extended the wheelbase and the wheel size of the car. The result is shorter overhangs and a lot more interior space, including a large storage area between the front seats.

The Concept Recharge also introduces a new Volvo design language. Continuing the theme of 'less but better', all unnecessary elements have been removed, and what remains is treated with a "high-precision, flush execution."

The traditional grille has been replaced with a shield-like structure, supported by a new interpretation of Volvo's Thor's Hammer headlight design. These include the latest HD technology-enabled pure graphic, which opens at night to reveal the main lamp units. Signature vertical rear lamps connect to the brand's strong design heritage but are reimagined with a set of wings that extend at higher cruising speeds to improve overall aerodynamics further.

Robin Page, head of design at Volvo Cars, said: "Our Concept Recharge represents a manifesto for the all-electric future of Volvo Cars, as well as a new type of vehicle. It displays new and modern proportions that go hand-in-hand with increased versatility and shows what technology can enable in terms of design.

"With the Concept Recharge, we continue the rich roots of Volvo's design DNA in a modern and fresh way as we move into our all-electric future. It represents everything we believe customers expect from a pure electric Volvo and we're excited to take this philosophy into our next generation of cars."


Article

Volvo Cars EV road map included better batteries, longer range

Sweden's Volvo Cars on Wednesday laid out an extensive road map to becoming a fully electric car maker by 2030, including plans to sell 600,000 battery electric vehicles at mid-decade and build a European battery gigafactory in 2026.

Volvo Cars EV road map includes better batteries, longer range


Source: www.timeslive.co.za

Sweden's Volvo Cars on Wednesday laid out an extensive road map to becoming a fully electric car maker by 2030, including plans to sell 600,000 battery electric vehicles at mid-decade and build a European battery gigafactory in 2026.

The detailed presentation on Volvo Cars' future follows the scrapping earlier this year of a proposed merger with the company's Chinese parent, Hong Kong-listed Geely Automobile. In March, Geely said Volvo Cars would explore capital market options, including an initial public offering and stock market listing.

During Wednesday's briefing, Volvo Cars also said it plans to equip many of its future vehicles with self-driving technology, including standard lidar sensors from Luminar Technologies Inc and computers from Nvidia Corp.

“Our goal is to build the safest cars possible, using all available technology,” said CEO Håkan Samuelsson.

For its future electric vehicles, Volvo Cars is working with Swedish partner Northvolt on a new generation of batteries with higher energy and designed to be packaged as a structural element of the vehicle.

The new batteries, due after 2025, will enable a longer driving range between charges — up to 1,006km — and much faster charging times.

Volvo Cars and Northvolt are planning to build a European battery plant in 2026 with 50gWh production capacity — enough to supply 500,000 vehicles or more, depending on battery size. In comparison, Tesla Inc's Nevada gigafactory has 35gWh capacity.

Samuelsson said Volvo Cars next year will unveil the first of its new-generation electric vehicles, a flagship SUV that will share its platform with additional models to follow.


Article

2021 Volvo Recharge all-electric concept car looks like it's gunning for Tesla

GOTHENBURG - According to Volvo Cars, electrification is more than simply a shift in powertrains. It represents a new paradigm in car design for the company and the Volvo Concept Recharge is a manifesto for the next generation of all-electric Volvo vehicles, they claim.

2021 Volvo Recharge all-electric concept car looks like it’s gunning for Tesla


Source: www.iol.co.za

GOTHENBURG - According to Volvo Cars, electrification is more than simply a shift in powertrains. It represents a new paradigm in car design for the company and the Volvo Concept Recharge is a manifesto for the next generation of all-electric Volvo vehicles, they claim.

Shown earlier today for the first time in an exclusive online unveiling, true to the heritage of Scandinavian design, the Volvo Concept Recharge embraces the mantra of 'less but better' at its core.

For instance, by removing the complexity of the internal combustion engine, the car’s designers have been able to evolve its proportions to increase interior space while also improving aerodynamic efficiency. Volvo believes that the result of all this is a vehicle that offers genuinely better solutions to support a sustainable family life.

Volvo’s first generation of electric cars such as the XC40 shares a floor with combustion engine-powered cars, which requires a balance in proportions and space to be able to accommodate both a battery pack and an internal combustion engine. The next generation of Volvo’s fully electric cars – the first of which is the company’s first SUV on a completely new electric-only technology base – will feature flat floors, as previewed in this Concept Recharge.

By removing the engine and replacing it with a full battery pack under the flat floor, the designers have extended the wheelbase and the wheel size of the car. The result is shorter overhangs, as well as a lot more interior space including a large storage area between the front seats. In the Concept Recharge these advancements have led designers to reposition the seats, optimise the roof profile and lower the hood of the car while retaining the high eye point beloved by drivers of cars like the Volvo XC40, XC60 and XC90. This approach creates efficiency gains in aerodynamics compared to a typical SUV, which improves range, they say.

This concept car also introduces a new Volvo design language. Continuing the theme of 'less but better', all unnecessary elements have been removed and what remains is treated with a high-precision, flush execution. The traditional grille has been replaced with a shield-like structure, supported by a new interpretation of Volvo Cars’ Thor’s Hammer headlight design. These include the latest HD technology-enabled pure graphic which open at night to reveal the main lamp units. Signature vertical rear lamps connect to the brand’s strong design heritage, but are re-imagined with a set of wings that extend at higher cruising speeds to further improve overall aerodynamics.

“Our Concept Recharge represents the future for the all-electric future of Volvo Cars, as well as a new type of vehicle,” says Robin Page, head of design. “It displays new and modern proportions that go hand-in-hand with increased versatility and shows what technology can enable in terms of design.”

The Volvo design language also takes a new form inside the Concept Recharge. The flat floor provides more space and a better seating position for all those inside the car. A large, 38cm standing touch screen is the centre of a new and improved user experience for the company’s next-generation connected infotainment system. Designed to be logical and intuitive to use, technology helps provide a serene and calm experience.

The latest infotainment technology goes hand in hand with those other hallmarks of Scandinavian design: clean lines and extensive use of sustainable and natural materials inside the cabin. “Inside the Concept Recharge, we create a truly Scandinavian living room feeling,” Page adds. “The interior integrates our latest user experience technology with beautiful, sustainable and natural materials. Each part of the interior is like a piece of art and could stand alone as individual furniture in a room. We use the latest technologies but not for their own sake. We always focus on the benefits that technologies can bring.”

Finally, the Concept Recharge also reflects Volvo Cars’ safety ambitions in coming years. A LiDAR sensor, built by technology company Luminar and a critical part of Volvo Cars’ plan for forthcoming safe autonomous drive technology, is placed in an optimal position on the roof to collect data on the environment around the car. “With the Concept Recharge we continue the rich roots of Volvo's design DNA in a modern and fresh way as we move into our all-electric future,” concludes Page. “It represents everything we believe customers expect from a pure electric Volvo and we’re excited to take this philosophy into our next generation of cars.”

Volvo SA hasn’t confirmed yet, however, we expect the production version of this vehicle to arrive in South Africa in 2023 so you better start saving up now if you want one.


Article

How real-time processing of data from cars is going to make the roads safer

GOTHENBURG - Volvo Cars has just announced that for its next generation of vehicles, it will be processing data from customer cars in real-time.n the fast-growing premium electric segment by 2030.

How real-time processing of data from cars is going to make the roads safer


Source: www.iol.co.za

GOTHENBURG - Volvo Cars has just announced that for its next generation of vehicles, it will be processing data from customer cars in real-time.

The Swedish company will use traffic data from real-life situations to develop new safety technologies. This data would use continuous inputs on the car’s environment from sensors like the high-resolution LiDAR technology. By allowing customers to choose and be a part of improving safety levels and traffic safety in this way, Volvo Cars says it can make continuous and much faster improvements to its vehicles, constantly improving safety levels.

Verified updates to existing systems and new features can be rolled out rapidly through over-the-air-updates, increasing the safety of Volvo cars step by step.

Furthermore, the processing of real time data will allow Volvo Cars engineers to validate and verify autonomous drive (AD) features quicker, in order to promote a safe roll-out of AD technology. Thanks to the data generated from millions of kilometres driven by tens of thousands of Volvo drivers around the globe, engineers would be able to validate AD features for specific geographic locations much quicker than with a limited number of cars on a test track.

The first car to benefit from this new approach to safety development is the company’s first SUV on a completely new electric-only technology base. Volvo Cars’ forthcoming fully electric flagship SUV will have industry-leading safety technology as standard. It will come with state-of-the-art sensors, including a LiDAR developed by Luminar and an autonomous driving computer powered by the NVIDIA DRIVE Orin™ system-on-a-chip, as standard.

“With help from real-life data we can speed up our development processes and go from years to days,” says Ödgärd Andersson, CEO at Zenseact, Volvo Cars’ autonomous driving software arm. “As real-time collection generates a lot more data, we can create better and higher-quality data sets that allow us to make better and quicker decisions on the next advancements in safety. We’re taking a giant leap to increase safety in and around our cars.”

Over time the car will improve and have the hardware and software capabilities to allow the car to take over on its own, in case the driver does not respond in life-threatening situations after repeated warnings. So while the driver always remains in ultimate control, the car and its safety technology can both support and watch over the driver like an extra pair of eyes and brains.


Article

Volvo hints at future car technology that will make life on the road easier

GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN - Volvo Cars will lay out its future technology roadmap today during the Volvo Cars Tech Moment, an online technology event that illustrates how it will transition towards becoming a fully electric premium car company and a world leader in the fast-growing premium electric segment by 2030.

Volvo hints at future car technology that will make life on the road easier


Source: www.iol.co.za

GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN - Volvo Cars will lay out its future technology roadmap today during the Volvo Cars Tech Moment, an online technology event that illustrates how it will transition towards becoming a fully electric premium car company and a world leader in the fast-growing premium electric segment by 2030.

During the live conference from Gothenburg, Sweden, that IOL Motoring will be attending, the company will give us a first glimpse of the technologies that underpin Volvo Cars’ future, in which all next generation cars will be purely electric. Representatives from Google, Luminar, Northvolt and NVIDIA will also join and contribute at the event.

The Volvo Cars Tech Moment will include an array of keynotes and interactive Q&A sessions that will provide exciting new details in areas such as the company’s path to full electrification, its ambition to take software development increasingly in-house, its centralisation of computing, its plans for the next level of safety technology and the plan for introduction of safe autonomous driving. As part of the event, the company will also unveil its future approach to infotainment and a concept car that visualises its technology roadmap and that shows an insight into the future of design in the pure-electric era.

“As we transition to becoming a pure electric premium car company by 2030, we are committed to creating the best cars in our 94-year history,” says Håkan Samuelsson, chief executive of Volvo Cars. “This is an exciting time in our development and we will deliver on growing customer demand for pure electric cars that offer seamless connectivity, industry-leading safety standards and advanced autonomous drive.”

Volvo Cars is committed to all-out electrification and has ambitious plans for its next generation of fully electric cars. It aims for cars that more than double the real world driving range compared to its current electric cars, allow for much faster battery charging and offer lower costs for owning and charging alike. By the middle of this decade it aims to sell 1.2 million cars globally, with at least half being fully electric cars.

Financially, Volvo Cars targets an annual operating margin of 8-10 percent by mid-decade, driven by increased sales and revenues across all three global sales regions, more effective sales and distribution channels, synergies with its affiliates and a broader range of fully electric cars. Profitability is expected to be further boosted by achieving gross margin parity between electrified and combustion engine-powered cars by mid-decade.

Together with a switch to core computing inside its cars through cutting edge NVIDIA technology, Volvo Cars will also move its software development in-house and focus on shorter development cycles, reflecting the growing role of software as a differentiator for the car of the future and a driver of profitable growth.

A clear departure from the static approach to development that has dominated the automotive industry for so long, this will allow Volvo Cars to improve flexibility, boost development speeds and quickly roll out new services, technologies and software over the air.

The next generation of Volvo models are expected to set new standards in safety. It will make its future cars hardware-ready for autonomous drive by including LiDAR sensors from Luminar as standard, while it is looking into harnessing the power of real-time data to constantly improve safety levels in its future cars. Volvo Cars will also continue its collaboration with Google, taking its industry-leading approach to infotainment and connectivity to the next level. A new infotainment system will focus on offering a simple, serene and safe experience, as well as a seamless integration between Volvo Cars and Google ecosystems.


Article

Closing loops: How Volvo plans to reduce its impact on the planet

JOHANNESBURG - Volvo Cars has announced that it’s aiming for annual savings of SEK 1 billion and reductions of 2.5 million tons in carbon emissions from 2025 using circular business principles.

Closing loops: How Volvo plans to reduce its impact on the planet


Source: www.iol.co.za

JOHANNESBURG - Volvo Cars has announced that it’s aiming for annual savings of SEK 1 billion and reductions of 2.5 million tons in carbon emissions from 2025 using circular business principles.

Supporting the company’s long-term goal of becoming a circular business by 2040, Volvo Cars will create closed material loops for emission-heavy materials such as steel and aluminium. It will also remanufacture, repair, reuse and refurbish parts.

“Volvo Cars has one of the most ambitious climate plans in the car industry, and if we are to reach our goals, we need to embrace the circular economy,” said Anders Kärrberg, head of global sustainability at Volvo Cars. “This requires us to rethink everything we do and how we do it. We put a strong focus on integrating sustainability into the way we think and work as a company, and we are making it as important as safety has always been to us.”

To become a circular business by 2040, Volvo Cars is convinced that every part in its cars should be designed, developed and manufactured to be used and reused, either by the company or its suppliers. By focusing on resource efficiency and retaining the value created in materials and components for as long as possible during the life cycle, the company wants to optimise the use of materials, components and cars, and eliminate waste in the process. This is said to lead to financial savings and new revenue streams, as well as significantly lowering its environmental impact.

Laying the groundwork for sustainability

Volvo Cars already remanufactures parts such as gearboxes and engines to make better use of materials and reduce emissions.

In 2020, around 40 000 parts were remanufactured, saving nearly 3 000 tons of CO2 emissions. By 2025, Volvo Cars aims to more than double its remanufacturing business. To ensure that valuable material can be kept in circulation, the company recycled 95% of its production waste last year. This included 176 000 tons of steel, avoiding the generation of nearly 640 000 tons of carbon dioxide.

The rise of new businesses around EVs

New business models such as giving electric vehicle batteries a second life are important from a circular business perspective. By using batteries in energy storage applications outside of cars, new revenue streams and cost savings can be realised while also extending the batteries’ life cycles.

Together with suppliers and partners, Volvo Cars is exploring the potential in second-life applications for its high-voltage batteries. A current example is the collaboration with BatteryLoop, a company within the Swedish Stena Recycling Group that reuses batteries from the automotive industry.

BatteryLoop and Volvo Cars use batteries from electrified Volvo cars for a solar-powered energy-storage system. From this month, the system will power charging stations for electrified cars and electric bikes at Swedish hygiene and health firm Essity’s business centre outside of Gothenburg. In a similar project, Volvo Cars, Comsys AB, a Swedish cleantech company, and Fortum, a European energy company, are engaged in a commercial pilot project. It aims to increase supply flexibility at one of Fortum’s hydropower facilities in Sweden while contributing to a second life for electric vehicle batteries at the same time. Battery packs from Volvo plug-in hybrid cars will serve as a stationary energy storage unit, helping to supply so-called “fast-balancing” services to the power system.

Through these and other projects, Volvo Cars is investigating how batteries age when reused in second-life applications that have significantly less aggressive cycling compared to in-car use.


Article

Here's how Volvo plans to lower CO2 emissions and become even greener by 2040

Besides their vehicles already being the safest in the market, Volvo plans to become a circular business by 2040.
This means that every part in its vehicles will be designed, developed and manufactured to be used and reused, either by the company or its suppliers. Additionally, emission-heavy materials such as steel and aluminium will also be re-manufactured, repaired, reused and refurbished.

Here's how Volvo plans to lower CO2 emissions and become even greener by 2040


Source: www.news24.com

Besides their vehicles already being the safest in the market, Volvo plans to become a circular business by 2040.

This means that every part in its vehicles will be designed, developed and manufactured to be used and reused, either by the company or its suppliers. Additionally, emission-heavy materials such as steel and aluminium will also be re-manufactured, repaired, reused and refurbished.

Anders Kärrberg, Head of Global Sustainability at Volvo Cars says: "Volvo Cars has one of the most ambitious climate plans in the car industry, and if we are to reach our goals, we need to embrace the circular economy."

Clean and green

The Swedish brand already re-manufactures parts such as gearboxes and engines to make better use of materials and reduce emissions - last year, around 40 000 parts were recycled.

To ensure that valuable material can be kept in circulation, they recycled 95% of its production waste last year. This included 176 000 tonnes of steel, avoiding the generation of nearly 640 000 tonnes of CO2.

Volvo is also exploring the potential in second-life applications for its high-voltage batteries. An example is the collaboration with BatteryLoop a company within the Swedish Stena Recycling Group that reuses batteries from the automotive industry.

BatteryLoop and Volvo use batteries from electrified vehicles for a solar-powered energy-storage system. Starting in April, the system will power charging stations for electrified cars and bikes at Swedish hygiene and health firm Essity's business centre.

Beyond efficiency

Volvo, Comsys AB, a Swedish cleantech company, and Fortum, a European energy company, are engaged in a commercial pilot project. It aims to increase supply flexibility at one of Fortum's hydropower facilities in Sweden while contributing to a second life for EV batteries.

Battery packs from Volvo plug-in hybrid's will serve as an energy storage unit, helping to supply so-called 'fast balancing services to the power system.

In 2020, Volvo became a member of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, the world's leading circular economy network.

Joe Murphy, Network Lead at the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, says: "We welcome Volvo's commitment to design, develop and manufacture its products to be used and reused. It is very encouraging to see the link being made between circular solutions, business strategy and a reduction in carbon emissions. The circular economy offers companies a framework for viable long-term growth that also benefits society and the environment."


Article

The Volvo XC40 P8 Recharge is the newest kid on the SA EV block

Joining the likes of the Mini Cooper SE, BMW i3, Jaguar I-Pace and Porsche Taycan, the new Volvo XC40 P8 Recharge is the latest EV to avail itself to local motorists.

The Volvo XC40 P8 Recharge is the newest kid on the SA EV block


Source: www.timeslive.co.za

Joining the likes of the Mini Cooper SE, BMW i3, Jaguar I-Pace and Porsche Taycan, the new Volvo XC40 P8 Recharge is the latest EV to avail itself to local motorists.

This all-electric version of the popular XC40 crossover sports a 78kWh battery pack powering two electric motors – one on the front axle and one at the rear. According to Volvo it offers a maximum driving range of 410km on a single charge. With 304kW and 660Nm on tap it will also scamper its way to 100km/h in an impressive 4.9 seconds.

How much will it cost? The new XC40 P8 Recharge starts at R1.2m. This includes all taxes and a Volvo Care package that sweetens the deal with a five-year maintenance plan and warranty, three years of insurance, the use of a Volvo petrol car for two weeks per year for three years, plus a home charger that includes all necessary charge cables.

Available exclusively from the recently launched My.Volvo online store, orders for XC40 P8 Recharge open on May 10 with deliveries set to commence in August this year.


Article

You now can purchase the Volvo XC40 P8 Recharge online

Volvo Car South Africa has announced the pricing for one of the most eagerly awaited cars to be launched in South Africa this year, namely the XC40 P8 Recharge all-electric.

You now can purchase the Volvo XC40 P8 Recharge online


Source: www.gq.co.za

Volvo Car South Africa has announced the pricing for one of the most eagerly awaited cars to be launched in South Africa this year, namely the XC40 P8 Recharge all-electric.

Volvo XC40 P8 Recharge orders are officially being taken from this month (10 May 2021), however the vehicle popped up online in the OEM’s online store “for sale” last night.

Deliveries will commence in August/September this year and pricing for the car will start at R1,2 million (including VAT). According to Greg Maruszewski, managing director at Volvo Car South Africa, the company has worked hard to offer this luxury all-electric vehicle at a competitive price.

“All-electric vehicles sold in South Africa have traditionally come with hefty price tags – and this has undoubtedly been a deterrent. We know that there is an appetite in South Africa for electric cars and we were determined to give customers an attractive price,” he says.

In addition to the announcement of the relatively competitive price tag, the company also announced that the car will be sold exclusively online via the company’s new website, My Volvo. This unique online store enables South Africans to purchase or rent a new car in as little as 20 minutes – and without leaving their home. Customers only need to follow five steps to select the car and arrange both finance and delivery (or collection).

Volvo’s first all-electric vehicle, the XC40 P8 Recharge is capable of travelling up to 418 km on a single charge. It should deliver brisk performance, with its twin electric motors producing 304kW of power and 660Nm of torque to deliver a 0-100 km/h time of just 4.9 seconds.

Care package comes standard

    Included in the pricing of the Volvo XC40 P8 Recharge is the Volvo CARE package. This includes:

  • A five-year maintenance plan and warranty (eight-year/160 000km warranty on the battery pack)
  • Three years of comprehensive insurance
  • Use of a petrol car for two weeks per year for three years (if you want to take extended journeys)
  • And a home charger station that includes charge cables.

Volvo Cars kicked off 2021 on a high note – with global sales increasing by 40.8% in the first quarter of the year (versus the same period last year). Volvo Cars’ Recharge range accounted for 26% of all Volvo cars sold worldwide in March.

“The Volvo XC40 P8 Recharge all-electric is clearly a sign of things to come; last month the company announced that it would only manufacture electric cars by 2030, with all sales to be online. So, our future is clear, and it will be fully electric, sustainable, and online,” concludes Maruszewski.


Article

Volvo To Supply Cars For China’s DiDi’s Autonomous Driving Fleets

Swedish automaker Volvo is to supply cars for Chinese ride-hailing giant DiDi’s autonomous driving fleets. DiDi, a Chinese Uber competitor with more than 550 million users and tens of millions of drivers, and Volvo have signed a strategic collaboration agreement on autonomous vehicles for DiDi’s self-driving test fleet.

Volvo To Supply Cars For China’s DiDi’s Autonomous Driving Fleets


Source: www.techfinancials.co.za

Swedish automaker Volvo is to supply cars for Chinese ride-hailing giant DiDi’s autonomous driving fleets. DiDi, a Chinese Uber competitor with more than 550 million users and tens of millions of drivers, and Volvo have signed a strategic collaboration agreement on autonomous vehicles for DiDi’s self-driving test fleet.

Volvo Cars will provide DiDi with XC90 cars equipped with necessary backup systems for functions such as steering and braking, and collaborate with DiDi Autonomous Driving to integrate the additional software and hardware required to make it fully ready for autonomous drive.

The XC90 cars will be the first to integrate DiDi Gemini, DiDi Autonomous Driving’s new self-driving hardware platform and are intended to be deployed for ride-hailing in DiDi’s network in the future.

In 2020, Volvo Cars provided DiDi with Volvo XC60s for use in Shanghai’s first pilot robotaxi programme. People in certain areas of Shanghai could book trips by robotaxi in the DiDi app and be driven autonomously, while the cars were monitored by a safety driver and engineer.

“This strategic collaboration with DiDi Autonomous Driving is further validation of our ambition to be the partner of choice to the world’s leading ride-hailing companies,” said Håkan Samuelsson, Volvo Cars’ chief executive.

“Combining DiDi’s expanding robotaxi programme with our safe cars creates a great match to build trust among consumers for autonomous ride-hailing.

Volvo Cars’ partner-of-choice ambition comes as ride-hailing firms around the globe seek to expand their fleets with fully autonomous cars in a safe and responsible way. The reputation of Volvo Cars as a global leader in automotive safety is a strong asset as it pursues this ambition.

“In expanding partnerships with global automotive industry leaders, we believe shared, electric and autonomous vehicle networks will be crucial for future urban transport systems to achieve the highest safety and sustainability standards,” said Bob Zhang, CEO of DiDi Autonomous Driving and CTO of Didi Chuxing.

“DiDi Gemini, our new self-driving hardware platform incorporates critical hardware improvements from our test passenger service operations in Shanghai. With Volvo Cars’ leadership in safety, we look forward to achieving new milestones towards future autonomous transport services.”

DiDi Gemini

DiDi Gemini is DiDi Autonomous Driving’s new self-driving hardware platform. Based on DiDi’s massive database of ride-hailing data and real-world road test data, DiDi Gemini incorporates critical hardware upgrades including improved sensors, 700TOPS computing power, and ASIL-D rated fallback system. DiDi Gemini achieves multi-layered redundant protections to enhance the overall safety of our autonomous driving experience.


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Busted: the myth that Volvos have poor resale values

Volvos have poor resale values." This is a statement that is still heard sometimes in South Africa. Yet, nothing could be further from the truth.
The reality is that the brand performs exceptionally well in the used car arena and many Volvo models are best-in-class when it comes to resale values.

Busted: the myth that Volvos have poor resale values


Source: www.news24.com

Volvos have poor resale values." This is a statement that is still heard sometimes in South Africa. Yet, nothing could be further from the truth.

The reality is that the brand performs exceptionally well in the used car arena and many Volvo models are best-in-class when it comes to resale values.

According to Greg Maruszewski, Managing Director at Volvo Car South Africa, the perception of poor resale values for Volvos is a uniquely South African problem. "This situation doesn't apply anywhere else in the world.

On the contrary, Volvos are perceived to have good resale values in other markets – and this is also the reality in South Africa. In Europe, dealers don't want the cars to cross borders, so they will often pay a premium to retain them. However, turning to the local situation, possibly because of a legacy of low resale values, some South Africans believe that this remains the case today. And it certainly doesn't!" he comments.

While three-year-old XC40 and XC60 are best-in-class when it comes to resale values, one-year-old Volvos retain a presentable 87 to 90% of their Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price (MSRP).

But what factors influence resale values? This is a somewhat complex issue – because values are affected by both tangible and non-tangible factors. The perception of the brand and the popularity of the model, for instance, come into play. So too does the vehicle's condition, mileage, engine type and transmission (most people want an automatic). Awards can also play a role – the XC40, XC60 and XC90's bulging trophy cabinets have also bolstered their resale values.

Kriben Reddy, head of Auto at TransUnion Africa, says that several Volvo models retain strong resale values when compared to their competitors in the local pre-owned vehicle market.

"Volvos are becoming increasingly popular on our roads. They put a lot of focus on the SUV segment and are strategically offering the South African consumer attractive, high-specification vehicles at significantly lower prices than their rivals. This is going to drive higher resale values as more consumers see the value in these remarkable vehicles," said Reddy.

Then there are some cars that are simply star performers in the used car market. The Volvo C30 is one such case; you would generally pay over the book value, and you will sell over book value too. Buyers take great delight in acquiring one of these Volvos – because you get a lot of car for relatively little money.

However, ultimately, resale values can be impacted by training and education. For this reason, Volvo Car South Africa regularly educates both its dealer network and used car managers from outside of the network, who trade in Volvos. Focus areas include performance and safety as well as pricing (Volvo has implemented fewer price increases than some German rivals). It's a case of informing/educating, managing perceptions and – most importantly – debunking myths.


Article

Volvo Cars to lower CO2 emissions and save billions in circular business aim

Volvo Cars aims for annual savings of SEK 1 billion and reductions of 2.5 million tonnes in carbon emissions from 2025 using circular business principles.
Supporting the company’s long-term goal of becoming a circular business by 2040, Volvo Cars will create closed material loops for emission-heavy materials such as steel and aluminium. It will also remanufacture, repair, reuse and refurbish parts.

Volvo Cars to lower CO2 emissions and save billions in circular business aim


Source: communitybynd.com

Volvo Cars aims for annual savings of SEK 1 billion and reductions of 2.5 million tonnes in carbon emissions from 2025 using circular business principles.

Supporting the company’s long-term goal of becoming a circular business by 2040, Volvo Cars will create closed material loops for emission-heavy materials such as steel and aluminium. It will also remanufacture, repair, reuse and refurbish parts.

“Volvo Cars has one of the most ambitious climate plans in the car industry, and if we are to reach our goals, we need to embrace the circular economy,” said Anders Kärrberg, Head of Global Sustainability at Volvo Cars. “This requires us to rethink everything we do and how we do it. We put a strong focus on integrating sustainability into the way we think and work as a company, and we are making it as important as safety has always been to us.”

To become a circular business by 2040, Volvo Cars is convinced that every part in its cars should be designed, developed and manufactured to be used and reused, either by the company or its suppliers.

By focusing on resource efficiency and retaining the value created in materials and components for as long as possible during the lifecycle, the company wants to optimise the use of materials, components and cars, and eliminate waste in the process. This will lead to financial savings and new revenue streams, as well as significantly lowering its environmental impact.

Volvo Cars already remanufactures parts such as gearboxes and engines to make better use of materials and reduce emissions. In 2020, around 40,000 parts were remanufactured, saving nearly 3,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions. By 2025, Volvo Cars aims to more than double its remanufacturing business. To ensure that valuable material can be kept in circulation, the company recycled 95 per cent of its production waste last year. This included 176,000 tonnes of steel, avoiding the generation of nearly 640,000 tonnes of CO2

In 2020, Volvo Cars became a member of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, which is the world’s leading circular economy network.

“We welcome Volvo Cars’ commitment to design, develop and manufacture its products to be used and reused. It is very encouraging to see the link being made between circular solutions, business strategy and a reduction in carbon emissions,” said Joe Murphy, Network Lead at the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. “The circular economy offers companies a framework for viable long-term growth that also benefits society and the environment.”

New business models such as giving electric vehicle batteries a second life are important from a circular business perspective. By using batteries in energy storage applications outside of cars, new revenue streams and cost savings can be realised while also extending the batteries’ lifecycles.

Together with suppliers and partners, Volvo Cars is exploring the potential in second-life applications for its high-voltage batteries. A current example is the collaboration with BatteryLoop, a company within the Swedish Stena Recycling Group that reuses batteries from the automotive industry.

BatteryLoop and Volvo Cars use batteries from electrified Volvo cars for a solar-powered energy-storage system. Starting in April, the system will power charging stations for electrified cars and electric bikes at Swedish hygiene and health firm Essity’s business centre outside of Gothenburg.

In a similar project, Volvo Cars, Comsys AB, a Swedish cleantech company, and Fortum, a European energy company, are engaged in a commercial pilot project. It aims to increase supply flexibility at one of Fortum’s hydropower facilities in Sweden while contributing to a second life for electric vehicle batteries at the same time. Battery packs from Volvo plug-in hybrid cars will serve as a stationary energy storage unit, helping to supply so-called ‘fast-balancing’ services to the power system.

Through these and other projects, Volvo Cars is investigating how batteries age when reused in second-life applications that have significantly less aggressive cycling compared to in-car use. They also allow the company to gain more knowledge about the commercial value of batteries after use in cars and identify potential future revenue streams.




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